Sports

Yoroshi offers four types of training: judo, jiu-jitsu, karate, and krav maga.

Judo

Judo (“gentle way”) is a Japanese martial art and competitive sport. Created by Jigoro Kano in 1882, judo uses grappling, throws, take downs, pinning holds, locks, and chokeholds; strikes, such as punches and kicks, are not allowed.

A judo training often contains the following: first a warming up and stretching; then practicing falling techniques, throws, and other techniques; then sparring matches, both standing (“randori tachiwaza”) and on the ground (“randori newaza”); and finally a cooling down with often some stretching as well. The training always focuses on control: throws and locks are done carefully to prevent injury.

Advanced training sessions also contain traditional practice forms, called “kata”.

Jiu-Jitsu

Jiu-jitsu (“gentle technique”) is a Japanese martial art focused on self defense. It uses both strikes, such as kicks and punches, as well as the techniques found in judo, throws, take downs, locks and chokeholds.

A jiu-jitsu training often contains the following: first a warming up and stretching; then practicing basic strikes and falling techniques; then practicing self defense techniques based on attack scenarios, as well as and specific locks and chokeholds; and finally a cooling down with often some stretching as well. The training always focuses on control: strikes to the body are not full contact and often with protective gear; strikes to the head are disallowed altogether; throws and locks are done carefully to prevent injury.

Advanced training sessions also contains sparring matches, in which striking, grappling, and ground techniques are all allowed.

Karate

Karate (“empty hand”) is traditional Japanese martial art and competitive sport, focusing on empty handed blocks and strikes. The karate style X is wado-ryu (“school of the way of harmony”), founded in 1934 by Hironori Otsuka. Wado-ryu is characterized by the directness of the movements, with punches (fists, open hand, elbows), kicks (feet, knees), and a specific movement called “tai sabaki”, used for evading and attacking the opponent simultaneously.

A karate training often contains the following: first a warming up and stretching; then “kihon”, in which the students form a line and practice basic techniques; then practicing attack and defense techniques based on combat situations; then sparring with competition rules; and finally a cooling down with often some stretching as well. The training always focuses on control: strikes to the body are not full contact and often with protective gear; strikes to the head are disallowed altogether.

In order to advance to the next belt, students learn practice forms called “kata”, which are more extensive than in judo and must be learned by heart.

Krav Maga

Krav maga (“contact combat”) is a self defense system developed in Israeli military. Krav maga classes focus on practical self defense: all techniques are allowed, including locks and strikes to vital points.

A krav maga training often contains the following: first a warming up and stretching; practicing basic techniques; then practicing attack situations with a focus on specific techniques; then sparring ; and finally a cooling down. The training always focuses on control: strikes to the body are not full contact and often with protective gear; strikes to the head are disallowed altogether; throws and locks are done carefully to prevent injury.